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ID My Older Hammond Organ

General Info about Hammond

The following information is provided to help you only to identify and/or locate the model number of a Hammond Organ because of the following:

  • The original Hammond Organ Company, which started in 1936 and ceased operation in the mid 1980's, made a great many models and variety of models.

  • Two Other Owners. The Hammond name has been owned by two different companies since the mid 1980's; An Australian company and the present day owner Suzuki Musical Instruments, LTD of Japan, known here in the United States as Hammond Suzuki USA. Both have manufactured a good number of models as well.

4 Basic Cabinet Types

There are only four basic cabinet designs that Hammond Organ and its predecessor companies have used, and they are:

RT Series

Grand100

CS285a

926 Classic

Number of Keyboars & Pedals

  • Two 61 Note Keyboards and 32, Long, Radiating, & Concaved Pedals

  • Three 61 Note Keyboards and 32, Long, Radiating & Concaved Pedals

Console Organs
X66
E100
Concord

Number of Keyboards and Pedals

  • Two 61 Note Keyboard and 25 Long, Flat, Radiating Pedals.

Spinet Organs
J300
Aurora
XH272

Number of Keys (Black and White) & Number of Pedals

  • Two 44 note keyboards and 12 short pedals (found on very early models)

  • Two 44 note keyboards and 13 short pedals

  • Two 37 note keyboards and 13 short pedals

  • Two 49 note keyboards and 13 short pedals

  • Two 61 note keyboards and 13 short pedals

Signal Keyboard Organs
ExtraVoice
Piper
XB2

Number of Keys
Number of Pedals (if any)

  • One 37 Note keyboard

  • One 44 Note keyboard

  • There were several that had a variety of configurations depending on what the function of the left or bottom octave did.

  • One 61 Note keyboard.

    • This is most offten found on the newer portables. However, the orginal Hammond Organ company did have a couple of products that had one 61 note keyboard

    • As to the newer portables a lower keyboard and pedals can be added. in the case of the pedals a 13 note spinet or 25 note console style pedal boards can be added.

  • Some had 2 pedals and some had 13 pedals

 

Locating The Model Number

This is something that you should be able to locate with some ease depending on the age and the model. Here are the basic locations.

This will require you to pull the organ away from the wall, assuming it's against the wall, and in some cases removing the back of the organ on some of the Console organs.

Some of the organs have the model and serial number plate located on the lower left or right hand corners of the organ.

On the newer organs, starting in the 70's Hammond got smart and made it easier than pulling the organ away from the wall. If you look under the left or right side of the keyboard you will find the model and serial number information.

What's It Worth - Value

  • There is no way to give an exact value of a Hammond organ over the internet or phone. Just because the name Hammond is on an organ it doesn't mean that it has any value. ONLY certain models have value, which are mostly the vintage tonewheel organs console organs.

  • Hammonds that are all tube like the Chord organ, transistor and the LSI (Large Scale Integrated circuit) models have little to no real value. If you call or write us for a some idea of value, you may not like what you are going to be told. Again, JUST because the name Hammond is on the organ doesn't mean the organ has any real value.

What determines value of a Tonewheel Hammond

 

This has to do with the cabinet, the electronics, and the mechanical condition of the organ.

Believe it or not, depending upon where you are located, this can be a factor due to demand.

Just because the name Hammond is on an organ doesn't mean that it is worth a great deal. Only a select group of Hammond organs fall into this category. In general, and the word "general" must be stressed, the only models that have held their value are the tonewheel models, and that is limited to a select group, as well.

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